Things that Annoy Wheelchair Users [Infographic]

Oct 09 2015

Advanced Mobility Scooters has released an infographic that addresses and visualizes things that annoy wheelchair users. The infographic provides specific details about the behavior of others, specifically those who are not in wheelchairs. It is important that society learn to respect, and adhere to rules when it applies to those with mobility issues.

Often the annoying situation stems from a non-wheelchair user not knowing how to communicate well with people who are physically disabled. Learning what not to do in the presence of wheelchair users is essential to treating others with the respect they deserve. The following list are the most common things that annoy wheelchair users.

Often the annoying situation stems from a non-wheelchair user not knowing how to communicate well with people who are physically disabled. Learning what not to do in the presence of wheelchair users is essential to treating others with the respect they deserve. The following list are the most common things that annoy wheelchair users.

  • Not physically disabled people parking in accessible parking spaces
  • Talking over the wheelchair users head as if they are not there
  • Congratulating the wheelchair user for going to the store as if it were some kind of an accomplishment
  • Asking the wheelchair user if they can pop a wheelie
  • Patting the wheelchair user on the head
  • Speaking slowly to the wheelchair user simply because they are in a wheelchair
  • Accessible bathroom stalls being used by an able-bodied person
  • Continuing to insist on helping the wheelchair user after they have already said “no thanks”
  • Strangers asking the wheelchair user what happened to them
  • Not inviting the wheelchair to an event to help them avoid frustration
  • Holding onto the back of the wheelchair so the user can’t move
  • Asking the wheelchair user how fast the chair can go

When in the presence of a wheelchair user, remember that they are people just like you, they just get around differently. They have feelings, good days, bad days and are capable of independently getting through their daily schedules perfectly. It is understandable that you may get nervous at first because you don’t know what to say, or you are afraid you will say something rude. The general rule is to ignore the wheelchair and treat the person as you would everyone else.

 



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